Cooking Classes in Asakusa Area

A popular destination in Tokyo, Asakusa retains the feel and architecture of Tokyo's past. The district is home to Sensoji, a Buddhist temple built in the 7th century. You can enjoy traditional Japanese design and food in Asakusa, and even try your hand at cooking your own Japanese dishes through a cooking class.


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FAQ About Cooking Classes in Asakusa

  • What are the best cooking classes in Asakusa for vegetarians?

    Some of the best cooking classes for vegetarians in Asakusa include Tofu Dishes for Vegetarians.

  • Which cooking classes are offered in English in Asakusa?

    All cooking classes in Asakusa on airKitchen are offered in English.

  • What is the best cheap cooking class in Asakusa?

    Popular cheap cooking classes in Asakusa include Japanese Home Cooking Class.

  • Which cooking class is popular in Asakusa?

    Tofu Dishes for Vegetarians is popular with other travelers visiting Asakusa.

  • How much does it cost to join a cooking class in Asakusa?

    On average cooking classes in Asakusa cost ¥5861 per person (based on airKitchen prices).

Let's Know More About Asakusa!

Asakusa Sightseeing Spots

  • Kaminarimon Gate

    Kaminarimon Gate

    Kaminarimon Gate is one the large entrance gates of the famous Sensoji Temple. Four statues are housed in the gate, and an iconic giant red lantern hangs from underneath the center of the gate.

  • Nakamisedori Street

    Nakamisedori Street

    Another popular landmark in Asakusa is Nakamisedori, a souvenir shopping street located just inside Kaminarimon Gate. You can stock up on traditional Japanese knick knacks as souvenirs and pick up traditional Japanese snacks from the street food stalls lining this street.

  • Otori Shrine

    Otori Shrine

    Otori Shrine is a small Shinto shrine most famous for the Toro no Ichi celebration held each November. On two or three days in November associated with the rooster, a market comes to life at Otori Shrine and merchants sell traditional goods like small decorated rakes.

  • Tokyo Skytree

    Tokyo Skytree

    Tokyo Skytree is the tallest tower in the world, serving both as a broadcasting and observation tower. Visitors are rewarded with sweeping views of the Tokyo metropolis and beyond from the observation deck.

  • Imado Shrine

    Imado Shrine

    Imado Shrine is the birthplace of maneki-neko, a Japanese charm that is a white cat figurine waving one paw. They make popular souvenirs and are often seen at the entrance of Japanese businesses. The shrine is also a popular destination for those seeking good luck in matters of love and marriage.

  • Asakusa Shrine

    Asakusa Shrine

    This Shinto shrine is one of only two buildings that survived World War II in the area, and thus has been named an Important Cultural Property in Japan. Asakusa Shrine was built to honor the three men who constructed the neighboring Sensoji Temple.

  • Asakusa Demboin Dori

    Asakusa Demboin Dori

    Designed to look like Edo streets of the past, Demboin Dori is a shopping and dining area where you can buy souvenirs for loved ones back home or grab a bite to eat. It lies just outside Sensoji Temple.

Access to Asakusa

  • From <a href='https://airkitchen.me/list/tokyo.php' style='text-decoration: underline'>Tokyo</a> Station to Asakusa Station

    From Tokyo Station to Asakusa Station

    Take the JR Chuo Line to Kanda Station (2 minutes) and transfer to the Ginza Subway Line for Asakusa (11 minutes).

  • From <a href='https://airkitchen.me/list/shibuya/' style='text-decoration: underline'>Shibuya</a> Station to Asakusa Station

    From Shibuya Station to Asakusa Station

    Take the Marunouchi Subway Line to Akasakamitsuke Station (8 minutes) and transfer to the Ginza Subway Line for Omotesando Station (5 minutes) and transfer to the Hanzomon Subway Line for Asakusa (2 minutes).

  • From <a href='https://airkitchen.me/list/shinjuku/' style='text-decoration: underline'>Shinjuku</a> Station to Asakusa Station

    From Shinjuku Station to Asakusa Station

    Take the JR Chuo Line to Kanda Station (11 minutes) and transfer to the Ginza Subway Line Asakusa (9 minutes).

  • From <a href='https://airkitchen.me/list/ginza/' style='text-decoration: underline'>Ginza</a> Station to Asakusa Station

    From Ginza Station to Asakusa Station

    Take the Ginza Subway Line to Asakusa (17 minutes).

Why Taking a Cooking Class in Asakusa is a Must-Do

Cooking classes in Asakusa will not only teach Japanese course meals. Students will be learning how to make Japanese matcha tea. Get the chance to write your name in Japanese Calligraphy! Yes, something that is very cool and is not taught everywhere.

Take a closer look into the vintage heritage and how the Japanese cuisine links with the history and culture of Japan.


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